New online music streams available via TTU Libraries

Christopher Starcher in the TTU Library's Digital Media Services Center, who also serves as music-area librarian, has three new online music stream-subscriptions available for TTU staff and students via the Library website. I append the links and a short description of each:

(1) http://internal.ttu.classical.com/ (if on TTU campus); http://lib-w1.lib.ttu.edu/e-databases.pl?action=list&subj_number=12 (if logging-in from off-campus) "Classical Music Library is the world's largest multi-label database of Classical music recordings for listening and learning in libraries. The award-winning Classical Music Library's growing collection of 50,000-plus tracks for listening and searching is supplemented by extensive reference materials and backed by a powerful suite of tools designed to support learning. Classical Music Library is committed to offering recordings from the world's greatest labels to the library community. Our licenses include Hyperion, Bridge Records (contemporary composers), Sanctuary Classics, Artemis-Vanguard, Hänssler Classic, Vox and many more." [NB: this subscription is now permanent through the library's website, but only if we should use. Please encourage friends, colleagues, and others to use this database as frequently as possible; this will generate high "usage-statistics" and thus ensure our continued access to the service.]

In addition, Chris has set up two trial services:

(2) African American Song <http://lib-w1.lib.ttu.edu/e-databases.pl?action=list&db_id=390>
"African American Song is the first online resource to document the history of African American music in an online music listening service. The collection contains a diverse range of genres such as jazz, blues, gospel, ragtime, folk songs, and narratives, among others. This release features some 16,000 tracks of great historical recordings from Document Records. This great collection features recordings from the first half of the 20th century and includes iconic artists such as The Fisk Jubilee Singers, Memphis Minnie, Blind Willie McTell and Huddie Ledbetter. It provides a rich source of Blues and early Jazz recordings as well as a lot of sacred music." [Needless to say, this is both a fantastic, and long overdue, service providing access to Great Black Music in a university/library setting. Please take every opportunity to make use of this service, and make sure to employ the "Your Comments" button to add comments, thus improving the odds that the TTU Libraries will decide to extend from the trial to a permanent subscription.]

(3) Smithsonian Global Sound <http://lib-w1.lib.ttu.edu/e-databases.pl?action=list&db_id=391>
"Smithsonian Global Sound for Libraries, produced in partnership with Smithsonian Folkways Recordings, is a virtual encyclopedia of the world's musical and aural traditions. The collection provides educators, students, and interested listeners with an unprecedented variety of online resources that support the creation, continuity, and preservation of diverse musical forms. It includes the published recordings owned by the non-profit Smithsonian Folkways Recordings label and the archival audio collections of the legendary Folkways Records, Cook, Dyer-Bennet, Fast Folk, Monitor, Paredon and other labels. It also includes music recorded around the African continent by Dr. Hugh Tracey for the International Library of African Music (ILAM) at Rhodes University as well as material collected by recordists on the South Asian subcontinent from the Archive Research Centre for Ethnomusicology (ARCE), sponsored by the American Institute for Indian Studies." [NB: The Smithsonian/Folkways label, the cornerstone of the Smithsonian Global Sound project, is probably the most comprehensive vernacular-music commercial collection in the world. It is absolutely incredible and a fantastic teaching resource to have these recording available via online university subscription. As with the African-American collection above, please take every opportunity to employ the service, and please do use the "Your Comments" feature to ensure that the Libraries are aware of SOM support for their continuation.]